Filipino-style Picadillo with Potatoes

Searching for a simple-to-make and financial plan amicable dish that is loaded with solace food flavors? Filipino-style Picadillo is prepared in minutes and cooks in a single skillet addition to it accompanies two variants. Make it a soup or a good stew!

 

Table Of Contents

What is Picadillo

How to serve and store

Filipino-style Picadillo with Potatoes

I previously distributed this Picadillo with potatoes in April 2015, and I am representing it on incorporate one more delightful form of the recipe.

A couple of years prior, I shared my photograph of a picadillo with chayote on KP’s Facebook page, and one peruser remarked, “Goodness what a fascinating twist on picadillo. I’ve never had it like this.” Then seven days later, I shared my giniling na baby recipe, and another peruser remarked, “We call this picadillo at home.”

Growing up, I knew Filipino-style picadillo as a soup made of minced meat, tomatoes, and potatoes or chayote, so I didn’t comprehend the reference to giniling. Normally, I was a piece confounded and needed to do a little research on the historical background of the dish.

Filipino-style Picadillo with Potatoes

What is Picadillo

An impact of Spanish colonization, picadillo is a dish famous in the Philippines as well as other Latin nations. Its name is from the Spanish word “picar” and which signifies “to mince.”

It is customarily made of ground or minced meat, new tomatoes or pureed tomatoes, and different fixings plentiful in the area like potatoes, carrots, green peas, olives, and escapades.

From additional readings, I discovered that our neighborhood picadillo without a doubt has two sorts. One is the “soupy” rendition with chayote or potatoes (presented above), and the other is a hash-like stew like giniling na baka or arroz a la cubana.

As you can see from the recipe card underneath, the two renditions are really comparative other than diminishing how much water/stock, utilizing pureed tomatoes, and adding carrots, olives, and raisins in the stew variant.

The two different ways are tasty and picking either rely upon what you’re in the mindset for. I like the soupy assortment when the weather conditions is cold and crisp while the dry variant is ideally suited for potlucks or as pressed lunch to work.

How to serve and store

  • Picadillo is delicious as a lunch or dinner main dish with steamed rice.
  • You can serve the stew version as a meaty filling for pandesal as a meaty filling or turn it into a tasty torta (egg omelet) and enjoy it with banana ketchup!
  • Transfer leftovers to an airtight container and refrigerate for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 2 months.

Filipino-style Picadillo with Potatoes

Filipino-style Picadillo with Potatoes

Picadillo is a hearty Filipino ground beef stew with potatoes, carrots, and raisins in a rich tomato sauce. It’s easy to make and budget-friendly yet so hearty and tasty. Perfect with steamed rice!

Ingredients

 

Picadillo Soup Version

  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1 small onion, peeled and chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1 pound of ground beef
  • 3 large Roma tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 2 cups water or beef broth
  • 2 medium potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • salt and pepper to taste

Filipino-style Picadillo with Potatoes

Picadillo Stew Version

  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1 onion, peeled and chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1 1/2 pounds of ground beef
  • 1 tablespoon fish sauce
  • 1 cup tomato sauce
  • 1/2 cup crushed tomatoes
  • 1/2 cup water or beef broth
  • 2 medium potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 2 medium carrots, peeled and cubed
  • 2 tablespoons raisins
  • 1/2 cup frozen green peas, thawed
  • 1/4 cup green olives, pitted
  • salt and pepper to taste

 

Leave a Reply